Eye disease afflicts many Americans. While most people might experience eye irritation and blurry vision, age-related eye disorders can seriously affect those over 60 years old. Common age-related eye diseases are cataracts, retinal detachment, glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy, dry eye syndrome, macular degeneration, and presbyopia. Regular eye exams, eye surgery and lasik eye surgery can help to reduce age-related eye diseases. Atlanta has many qualified ophthalmologists and optometrists who are qualified to help Atlanta seniors. Regular eye checkups can help with early detection and to prevent vision loss.

The Atlanta Senior Resources Directory is the most comprehensive, fully researched and human-verified senior guide in the Metro Atlanta area. Provided free of charge to the public and professionals alike, it is filled with extensive resources useful to Atlanta area seniors, their families and caregivers. Some of the senior information resources are: Atlanta senior housing, Atlanta retirement living, Atlanta assisted living and personal care homes, Atlanta nursing homes, Atlanta hospice care, Atlanta in-patient hospice, Atlanta senior health care, Atlanta Alzheimer's and memory care, Atlanta home health care, Atlanta private home care, Metro Atlanta hospitals, classes, senior activities, adult day care, assistance, referral services, and much more.

Five Atlanta editions cover 12 counties: Cobb County, Cherokee County, Fulton County, DeKalb County, Gwinnett County, Hall County, Forsyth County, Douglas County, Fayette County, Clayton County, Henry County and Rockdale County. Additional Atlanta area counties covered by this website are: Banks County, Barrow County, Bartow County, Butts County, Carroll County, Clarke County, Coweta County, Dawson County, Floyd County, Gilmer County, Gordon County, Haralson County, Jackson County, Jasper County, Lumpkin County, Morgan County, Newton County, Oconee County, Paulding County, Pickens County, Polk County, Spalding County and Walton County.

An Optician is an eye care professional who provides corrective lenses based on a refraction prescription supplied by an optometrist or an ophthalmologist.

An Optometrist is a Doctor of Optometry, an O.D. (not to be confused with a Doctor of Medicine, an M.D.). To become an optometrist, one must complete pre-professional undergraduate college education followed by 4 years of professional education in a college of optometry. Some optometrists also do a residency.

An Ophthalmologist is an eye M.D., a medical doctor who is specialized in eye and vision care. Ophthalmologists are trained to provide the full spectrum of eye care, from prescribing glasses and contact lenses to complex and delicate eye surgery.

After 4 years of medical school and a year of internship, every ophthalmologist spends a minimum of 3 years of residency (hospital-based training) in ophthalmology. During residency, the eye M.D. receives special training in all aspects of eye care, including prevention, diagnosis, and medical and surgical treatment of eye conditions and diseases. An ophthalmologist may spend an additional year or two in training in a sub-specialty.


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